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“Anything that can improve security in the sector will be considered and implemented,” Houde-Roy said. “Pedestrian security must be a priority and we won’t compromise on this.”

Houde-Roy admitted, however, no significant improvements have been made up to this point because of Turcot and an agreement between the city and Transport Quebec not to worsen congestion around the project. She added any improvements to the area will only be implemented after the St-Jacques exit off the Ville-Marie Expressway reopens, slated for October.

While that particular intersection is problematic, Lambert said the whole area is badly designed and confusing for road users.

Daniel Quance at the intersection of de Maisonneuve Blvd. and Grey Ave. He broke his hip when had an accident with a car at that intersection last year.
Daniel Quance at the intersection of de Maisonneuve Blvd. and Grey Ave. He broke his hip when had an accident with a car at that intersection last year. Photo by John Mahoney /Montreal Gazette

Situated near two ramps to the Décarie Expressway, the MUHC superhospital, the Vendôme métro and train station, and a major cycling path, the area is a flurry of activity for all modes of transportation. The same city document showed that on de Maisonneuve between Addington and Claremont Sts, there were 62 accidents recorded in the same 2015-2017 time frame, resulting in injuries to eight motorists, 18 cyclists and one pedestrian.



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